Category Archives: Art

Thank You Gloria

My sister Gloria passed away today…but her spirit is still among us.

She gave love and hope to so many, even some who never had the opportunity to meet her. Through her amazing talent, Gloria inspired and taught young and old about the most important elements of life.

She is now at peace. May she rest in the knowledge of having done great work for others. God bless you Gloria. We love you and will always find meaning in your loving gifts to us. Thank you very much.


We are fortunate to be loved by Gloria.

Gloria Kliewer Roe is the most loving, caring and talented individual I’ve ever had the privilege to know. Throughout the challenges known as Life, we shared the most precious elements, love and respect. My sister Gloria dedicated her life of discipline and sacrifice to providing hope, guidance and assistance to others through her amazing artistry.

Continue reading Gloria

Enlightened Liberty


In 1886, U.S. President, Grover Cleveland, ordered that one of our statues serve as a lighthouse.  This statue was also the tallest iron structure erected as of that date. The electric lights were seen 24 miles away. The statue functioned as a lighthouse for the next 16 years, until March 1, 1902. The original name was, Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World.

The graphic above, is a digital mashup of two of Frank’s paintings, a lighthouse painting (the statue / lighthouse), the other is an eagle from another series, “Masters of the Earth.” They are combined here at his daughter’s request, as the eagle is in honor of her son (Frank’s grandson) now serving in the United States Air Force, as one of our guardians.

Though the United States has changed significantly since its founding, seemingly thrashed about by political conflict these days, the concept of Enlightened Liberty is still the best hope for humanity, to reduce suffering and bring greater peace to our planet. Let us all do what we can to provide a meaningful difference in the world and have our beacon of freedom shine brightly again. 

Thank you for your visit here …may you be blessed.




Calm Desktop Background

Frank just completed his latest painting titled “Calm” in acrylic on a 30” x 24” canvas, delivering a special edition top quality Giclée print to a wonderful supporter today. Frank is making an image of the painting available free to his friends as a desktop background. Just click-through to the highest resolution.

Text was added to remind us how to find calm in our lives, and borders were added to allow placement of desktop app icons. Enjoy…and take the opportunity to help others find calm in their lives as well.

Thank you for visiting here.


Show Compassion


This painting, “Benefaction” is in acrylic on a 30″ x 48″ wood panel. Frank portrays the challenge of a foggy day for a typical ship in trying to find its way along a rocky and dangerous coast.

It was a very joyful moment to see the light on the shore, while receiving guidance from a friendly sea-bird bringing the ship to the light. This allowed the ship to turn just in time to miss the hidden rocks and certain catastrophe.

May we all show compassion and do what we can to aid others avoid possible disasters that can appear so quickly for any of us.

Boston Light and Flying Santa


One of our favorite lighthouse traditions is the story of a man who showed uncommon respect for the Light Keepers and their families. Capt. William H. Wincapaw, known as an adventurous and skilled Airman, unknowingly began a tradition in 1929. He was just a guy who wanted to bring holiday cheer to the lighthouse keepers along the East Coast by dropping packages of toys, coffee, shaving supplies, and snacks around Christmas time. He soon became known by the Light Keepers as the Flying Santa. Over the decades the planes and pilots changed, but except for a break during World War II, the practice continues today, now by helicopter.

Frank wanted to pay respect to the tradition and special tribute to the new Airman in the family, his grandson Griffyn. So, the 30” x 24” acrylic on wood panel painting was produced and added to Frank’s lighthouse series. The lighthouse seen in this painting is the Boston Light. This is the site of the first lighthouse built in the United States, dating back to 1716, with the current one in the painting built in 1783. This painting honors those who have shown special care and concern for the all-important Light Keepers, as well as remote Coast Guard outposts.

We thank all those who bless and protect us with their courage.

Cape Mendocino Light and Virtue


Another lighthouse re-creation painting by Frank is “Cape Mendocino Light” as the original first-order Fresnel lens is now on display elsewhere, replaced by the standard ugly electric beacon. Even the original tower is now gone, misplaced at the entrance to an entertainment center. Frank and Mary visited and sketched the various elements at their current resting places to combine them into the historic perspective presented in the painting.

In this 48” x 30” acrylic on canvas, Frank portrays a time when the original lens was in place, and  the full-on effect could be enjoyed along with the setting sun if you were to find your way down the path to the remote location at just the right time.

The Light Keeper has done well, as the light is on before sunset. He is free to enjoy the show as an enlightening experience well-earned by his disciplined work.

Ben Franklin, perhaps the most virtuous of the Founding Fathers of the United States, is often misquoted as saying “Lighthouses are more helpful than churches.” What he really said in a letter to his wife on July 17, 1756 after almost being involved in a shipwreck was, “ Were I a Roman Catholic, perhaps I should on this occasion vow to build a chapel to some saint, but as I am not, if I were to vow at all, it should be to build a light-house.”

Franklin was an inventor, scientist, and statesman. Among Franklin’s inventions was the beginning of the American society. Franklin led a life based on virtue, something almost totally lost on today’s entertainment based culture. Perhaps the pendulum will swing back toward the virtue of caring about others at least as much as we care about ourselves for starters.

No matter if you agree with good old practical Ben’s values, a good practice is repeating useful actions, like a Light Keeper at the same time every day, faithfully…as others might be counting on you.

Even if there are obstacles in your way, or others try to block your path, just get out there and do the right thing anyway. Most likely there will be those who will value and appreciate what you do. But, even if you are alone on your journey, it is your journey after all, so you have the power to make the right choices and find joy in those actions.

Racing the Storm at Pigeon Point


If you Google “lighthouse in a storm” and then select the art category along the top, you’ll probably find an image of Frank’s Pigeon Point Lighthouse painting from one of the sites displaying his work near the top of the results. Pigeon Point is probably the most photographed lighthouse on the west coast due to its classic shape.

You can see the lighthouse driving along California Highway 1, 20 miles south of Half Moon Bay and 27 miles north of Santa Cruz. Heck, you don’t even have to leave your car, or even slow down to snap a picture of this beauty…such a shame. You should have to walk to enjoy this kind of setting…all the cars just ruin the effect of this cathedral.

Frank painted this work both “plein air” at the site on a sunny day, and then back in his studio for the storm effects. (You can click-through the picture to get a more detailed view.) Frank’s landscape teacher thought the painting too dark to become popular.

When traveling the Pacific coast, Frank and Mary were struck by the stories of lighthouse keepers, and their dedication to working the lights to protect the lives of people traveling along the treacherous shores.

This  48″ x 30″ acrylic on canvas painting “Racing the Storm at Pigeon Point” above is part of a series of lighthouse paintings by Frank. In this series, he re-creates settings from over 100 years ago, when the lights were critical life savers, while including some contemporary views and stories as well.

There were no electronics to guide the ships. The critical mechanics of the lights were driven by weights, pulleys, and gears. The Light Keepers kept the lights burning with oil and kerosene before electricity, sending beams of light over twenty miles out to sea. A daily practice of hard work by the Light Keepers was absolutely critical to keep a light working.

Frank has found his painting copied on other sites and even used in a YouTube video…but he is OK with that, as long as those that use his work share their profit from it with him.

Today, we should show our greatest respect to those who labor to make things of value to our lives, and treat them with fairness.